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Posts Tagged ‘Process Buddhism’

I just completed a weekend of working with a medicine woman here at Massage School. We started chatting about what I offer… and the list started growing long (not to brag or boast – I have been learning bodywork since 2003 – simply what is).

She has taken several levels of BodyTalk – a modality where we muscle test to see what is the priority for the client. It is a comprehensive and complex modality. I have only taken the first level – BodyTalk Access which was insightful and where I learned some beneficial techniques! Plus I have been fortunate enough to receive at least several dozen BodyTalk sessions from exchanging with a friend who has taken all the Advanced Courses in it. Therefore I feel like I have some knowledge of the protocol and the muscle testing for what is a priority.

I mention all that because I am now working on a protocol for a Kirby’s Modality BodyTalk style protocol. It is pretty crazy all that I can offer – especially with the half dozen or more modalities I am learning here in Massage School!

Oh – and I told the medicine woman about my conversation with my Tibetan Lama, Khenchen Konchog Gyaltsen – a clairvoyant and exceptionally clear and lucid spiritual teacher. When my main bodywork teacher, Janet Evergreen, asked him about what she should call all that she does, he didn’t miss a beat saying, “Process Buddhism.” Now I pretty much offer most of what Janet does (having studied with her since 2005), so the medicine woman here said that I better add “Process Buddhism” to my protocol! 🙂

In case you are wondering, here is my list so far of what I offer: 5-Elements (Chinese Medicine basics), Craniosacral Therapy, Polyvagal Work, Pre- and Perinatal Therapy (and Education), Visceral Manipulation, other Process-oriented Bodywork, BodyTalk Access techniques, Zapchen Somatics, Kundalini Yoga Kriya, Chi Kung advice, Tai Chi basics, Acupressure, Swedish Massage, Hot Stones Integrated Treatment, Herbal Wrap, Shiatsu, Reflexology, Working with Essential Oils, Buddha-Dharma teachings (I am only able to share the basics but this is enough for most clients), Spiritual Astrology, Medical Astrology, Non-Violent Communication, Conflict Resolution Techniques, Process Buddhism would  fall under several other categories.

It looks like I definitely need to narrow this down! Or at least find an efficient way to muscle test and get a category pretty quickly. I might need to delete several items off my list.. time will tell!

I will keep working on this when I have time (we have 3 tests this week and we are preparing to teach Kundalini Yoga – not as a yoga teacher, just as a check mark to make certain we understand K. Yoga).

Thank you for reading!

Have a beautiful Spring day / evening,

~km

 

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I want to write a post about how lucky I am to be one of my bodywork teacher’s senior students. Her name is Janet Evergreen. She is in her 60’s now, and she just, in a recent class, made a comment about starting to slow down how often she teaches her classes. This and her husband has been retired for a few years now, and they are ready to have some fun and travel. So I am yearning to take as many of her classes as possible to keep learning little tricks of the body-intelligent-mandala-oriented-heart-extension bodywork that she practices (those are my descriptions).

Just one example might be enough to explain how lucky I am to have met her and to be able to work with her for the past 12 years:

Some somatic experiences cannot be written about properly (but I will certainly try, ironic eh?). At least you will get a sense of how many layers we are tracking in her advanced classes.

I am on the massage table, about to get a treatment from one of Janet’s students, who has taken at least 3 classes with her (and I assisting).

She uses leg-arcing, a technique where you lift the legs and see where they want to go, follow the legs as they float. Then using the legs as a dowsing rod (basically), you look to see where in the torso they are pointing. We have tested this technique against acupuncturists measuring people’s organ pulses and gotten the same results.

So she wasn’t sure if the legs were indicating left lung or heart. I thought that sounded right.

I am going to fast forward (else this will be a ten thousand word diatribe about a 30 minute bodywork session). Suffice it to say that by this point, she had moved to sit at the head of the table with her arms over my chest, “listening” as it were to my lungs, mediastinum and heart and doing some movement to track both the motility and mobility of those organs. When she realized there was at least one sluggish point on my left lung where the tissue was kind of stuck, she got Janet’s attention to ask about it.

Janet came over and of course seemed to know what was needed before coming close to laying on of hands. She said, “Kirby, can you bring some micro movements into your body to bring some movement into your chest?” I was happy to oblige!

I started moving my arms and just making tiny movements of my belly and ribs. I wanted to double check – I asked, “the thumbs have the lung meridian on them right?” And yes, sure enough, they did.

Janet suggested, “Let your thumbs lead the movements.” By now my arms were gracefully weaving a pattern above my body, and then I started focusing on my thumbs. They started leading the little graceful dance above and off the sides of my torso, sometimes doing the same thing, and other times being dissonant.

Then Janet mentioned, “Let me hold those meridian points.” I should pause for a second and note that for at least ten years, Janet wove baskets when she and her family lived in West Virginia. And not just any baskets – she used oak, which means that her grip, even years after her basketweaving days, her grip is like having a clamp applied, or like vice grips. I noted this saying, “Wow. That is quite a hold you’ve got of my thumbs! What, did you used to weave baskets or something?” It was funny. And it kind of hurt – in a it hurts so good kind of manner.

I slowed down my movement, but the whole body movement from my thumbs continued. Sometimes my torso would lift off the table a bit, other times it was just my hands and arms moving. With Janet’s fingers attached to my thumbs, two little vice grips squeezing my lung meridians for dear life (or so it felt).

But something started to shift in my chest. As I moved from my thumbs, with the meridians being so stimulated, I could suddenly track the course of the meridian down my thumbs, running up the inside of my forearm, and then up the inside of my upper arms and close to my pectoral muscles into my chest. It was wild – warm lines were being drawn on me from the inside. Janet commented, “the right has settled down, but the left still has warmth coming off of it.” (Referring to my thumbs.) And she was right. My right lung was feeling open and calm and happy, while my left lung was still be bit tight or sluggish or sticky.

It just took a few more minutes of gracefully feeling through those meridians and dancing over my body with my arms. And I felt my left lung release, and so did Janet (through my lung meridians on my thumbs). And we both commented on it, she saying, “There it goes,” first.

She had been squeezing pretty good. So when she let go, I was left feeling the meridian lines for several minutes. She went on to squeeze my pinkies – the heart meridian in this case. And it was similar results. The practitioner still had her hands on my chest and was feeling and listening to my inner organs (through the ribs, through the fascia, etc).

Long story short. I had never felt my meridians come alive quite like that. It was another level of deepening of my learning.

I have experienced things in those bodywork classes (or retreats or meditation sessions) at her Sanctuary space that most people can’t even dream of, let alone talk about. I am so very fortunate. Maybe I have been Janet’s teacher in a past life, but I know she has been mine before.

Whatever the case may be, I thank my lucky stars that I have teachers and mentors in my life like her. Heart teachers who go above and beyond, who charge less than they could, who give back to their communities in so many different ways.

I intend to repay her kindness by teaching worthy students. They say that is the greatest way to repay a spiritual teacher (and by practicing what they have taught you). So I must practice self care. I must know that my heart has received valuable and precious transmissions which most people only wish for but never experience. And I must kindly hold my heart in the highest regard, not only because I (we all) have buddhanature coursing through me, but because I have been shown how to work with babies, children and adults in ways that most scientific health practitioners would scoff at (saying, “those results aren’t possible”). And then I intend to teach this material as well.

Advanced somatic therapies. That is a possible title, or like Khenchen Konchog Gyaltsen, one of our heart teachers says, “Call it Process Buddhism” when asked how to describe what Janet does. That pretty much sums it up. 🙂

Yet again, thank you for reading,

km

 

 

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If you are curious about what Process Buddhism is, then please go back to previous posts from December of 2008.  I attempt to describe this complex topic there.  Process Buddhism has elements from psychotherapy, Buddha-Dharma (Vajrayana), bodywork and trauma resolution among other potent, efficacious modalities.

Over the past few months, I had been suffering from some foggy-headedness as I was barely staying ahead of nursing school assignments and I was working full time.  Add to that watching the show Elementary and I had almost no time for me to rest down.  I was feeling a bit dissociative and I was on the verge of being overwhelmed almost daily.  So I called my friend and mentor and coach and bodywork teacher, someone who is a true spiritual healer, Janet Evergreen.  I have worked with her and taught workshops with her and learned from her since 2005 (in this lifetime).

When this new spring semester started, I was taking way too many classes and I did not use my few days of transition time very well, so when I started this semester of nursing classes, I was definitely overwhelmed.  Add to this a little health niggle I have been observing for a few months, and I was quite concerned that I could not handle my class load.

So I pressed the pause button on nursing school and I am taking care of me.  A part of me is / was quite pleased with this decision.  I am feeling more free and energized and relaxed.  And a part of me is conflicted – there was one class which is only offered in the spring, so by pressing the pause button, I am basically setting myself back a year.  This is disappointing.  I desperately need to rest and I believe I probably could have scraped by and at least made a “B” in that class.  I am still not entirely clear about my decision.

I knew I needed to “call in the big guns” as it were if I wanted to kick my old patterns and clear my head.

In my next post, I will go into detail about the session that I had.

So far, in the five days since, I am feeling more embodied, more potent, warmer and somehow more full.  Plus the pattern of beating myself up about withdrawing from that class is lessening.  I am practicing a little bit of metta loving-kindness everyday after that session and I am more in touch with my heart, gut, kidneys and body in general – more than I have been in months.

Therefore it was a great session.  Much needed.

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This material is copyrighted by M. Kirby Moore.  Reproduction without permission is prohibited.  Thank you for visiting!  If you want to support Kirby’s blogging efforts, you can also view his website at www.mkirbymoore.com


 

Yesterday I was fortunate to receive bodywork from a solid practitioner of the modality called Somatic Experiencing (SE).  I have been doing this trauma resolution type work – both giving and receiving for at least three to four years, and in fact, if you count Biodynamic Craniosacral work as being similar, then I have been going at it for closer to eight or nine years.

I do not mention this “time-in-service” to boast.  I mention it to show how long it can take to truly peel away the layers for healing and renegotiation of trauma.  In previous posts I have discussed both of these modalities, but I am nearly always amazed at the creativity and uniqueness of SE’s methods of gently yet firmly going through the layers of frozen tissue and organ systems, uprooting misunderstandings and wounded emotions wherever it encounters them.

What I am trying to say is: “WOW!!!”  And “Holy Toledo!!!”

Yesterday’s work felt like a little culmination of a few years of Pre- and Perinatal Psychology (read Birth Process) work I have been doing in addition to insights into my Astrology Chart in addition to this work in Somatic Experiencing.  Yes – you read this correctly; many pieces and many layers – it was pretty big!

I know I tend to say that phrase often.  Or at least I used to say that fairly often – I would come home from an SE treatment or from a class and go, “WOW!  That was big and amazing!”  And that was true.  Each layer tends to produce deeper and more complex discoveries and insights.  And you neither know how each layer will unfold, nor in what order the layers will unravel.  One of my fellow students said it best yesterday (it was an all day class in which I received such an incredible gift of open hearted embodiment):

She said, “Most people think that true freedom is being able to do what we want…  But actually, true freedom is being open to the mystery of the unknown.”  I think that sums up what is possible with Somatic Experiencing pretty darned well!  And she could easily be a teacher in her own right – these classes tend to attract some amazing and wise folks.

I am hesitant to describe the session without supplying some background context information.  Because how else could I possibly convey how big this is without doing so?  And I want to be compassionate about showing how much information and how many layers must be resolved before one can start to get to the “bottom” of the layers of trauma.  I mention I am getting to the bottom of my traumas, but I’m not sure.  I suspect I will be pleasantly surprised by all the discoveries still to come.  But once you are ready to start the deep mediastinum work (mediastinum is the complex matrix of connective tissue connecting and embracing and wrapping around all the tubes, nerves, organs and glands in the chest – the pericardium is a part of the mediastinum), it means that you have unglued many stuck parts and melted a number of frozen layers to get there!  So I must be doing something right.

So in a future post, very soon completed, I will elaborate.  🙂

Thank you for reading!

 

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This material is copyrighted by M. Kirby Moore. Reproduction without permission is prohibitted. Thank you for visiting.

Lord Jigten Sumgon’s promise – Mahakala – crows – event when receiving bodywork and mentioning the connection to the Lama

This was a full day for me. I bought a new car, which considering my history of ascetic thriftiness, is a big change. It’s a Corolla, so relatively cheap, reliable and good gas mileage. But I received a very obvious and auspicious sign this morning, prior to visiting the Toyota dealer, while I was receiving bodywork.

I was receiving from Jackie Emm, who is a very skilled and competent bodywork practitioner on top of having a soothing and healing presence and a soft, kind heart. Anyway, we started talking about Buddhism, and because we recently experienced the passing of a mutual friend, we spoke of Buddhism’s thoughts on death.

Let me pause a second for context and say that I have a connection with a Buddhist protector known as Mahakala (who has a connections with graveyards, death and transformation) and I have read that one of Mahakala’s symbols is the crow or raven. In Tibetan, Mahakala is known as the Great Black One (as I’m not sure if there is a word for midnight blue), so it seems fitting that Mahakala’s bird would be black and have to do with death and transformation.

With that said, Jackie was doing some energy work with my heart as I told her, “it is good you have a connection with Janet [Evergreen – another dedicated Buddhist practitioner] and I.”

“Why?” She answered. I have established a solid, trusting professional friendship with Jackie, so I felt it was okay to share what I am about to say next:

I said, “because if you have a strong connection with a serious Dharma practitioner, then you can think of that person at the time of your death. And due to their connection with authentic root and lineage lamas, you will be protected on your journey after you die.” And I am not joking here, as I finished saying this, a large crow flared its wings right outside the window as it flew by and I said, “the Dharma protectors are here.” And then the crow landed on the lamp post outside the other window and proceeded to caw toward us. I mentioned, more to myself than her, “Mahakala is right there!”

Considering Jackie had been really close with our friend who passed away, she admitted that she had asked for a sign as well. And, personally, I suspect Jackie is an old soul and a secret Bodhisattva. So the protectors revealed themselves, whatever the reason. And I had a great treatment as usual.

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Maitreya Buddha statue, Thiksey Monastery, Ladakh India

Maitreya Buddha statue, Thiksey Monastery, Ladakh India

This material is copyrighted by M. Kirby Moore.  Reproduction without permission is prohibited.  Please visit www.mkirbymoore.com to purchase astrology interpretations and support Kirby’s blogging efforts!

<revised on 2/2/10>  I have no expertise to be mentioning or introducing this potent topic.  However, because I wrote about it over a year ago, I feel it might be good to tell my readers what little I know about the subject.  So this post is about what little I know of Process Buddhism.

Well, I’ll attempt to tell you.  One of my main bodywork teachers, who teaches Cranio Sacral classes, along with offering mediation, meditation and peace building workshops asked her main Tibetan lama (teacher), Khenchen Rinpoche, Konchog Gyaltsen what she should call her body of work.  Because it is quite a mouthful to try to tell people all that she offered.  He responded, unequivocally and immediately with, “Process Buddhism.”

As far as my limited knowledge, and this is not an exhaustive list, here are some of the ingredients which go into the practice of Process Buddhism – having gone through a series of quality, grounded healing facilitation sessions over a long period of time – say anywhere from five to twenty years; maintaining a consistent, grounded spiritual practice (which leads toward the opening of a heart filled with vast loving kindness – willing to touch and be touched which also can take many years); learning a grounded healing facilitation modality (plus daily sincere spiritual practice) – psychotherapy, bodywork, mediation, counseling, meditation, peace building, advanced therapeutic techniques (EMDR or DNMS, etc), sounding / movement / breath work techniques (yoga, Continuum Movement, Zapchen for instance); and being open to and hungry for positive change.

Through Process Buddhism, if you want to, if you are ready and if you do not mind some discomfort at times, amazing insights and awareness can be gained relatively quickly (there are techniques for accelerated work – which I have only touched the surface of).  [Disclaimer – discomfort is not a good thing – if you have a qualified teacher / therapist to lead you through the process, then some rare discomfort, as in growing pains, might be okay.  I only recommend discomfort if you have a qualified teacher.  Otherwise be gentle, go slow, practice kindness to self.  Move in the direction of ease.  Do what brings you joy.  PERIOD.  :-)]

Next, I will write about the many possibilities which come from blending modalities as it were.  And I just want to state again, that without a fully qualified teacher / professional counselor / grounded, spiritual path, I would not recommend doing any of the above on your own.  And I am not a qualified teacher, having only several years on the Tibetan Buddhist path, I am still struggling with many inner conflicts and afflictions.

For book recommendations on all of the eclectic ingredients which go into the soup known as Process Buddhism, visit my aStore at http://astore.amazon.com/kirmoosblo-20 or click the link to the right.  Proceeds support blogging and Dharma activities.

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